• Wholly crafted from lustrous silk and printed with original artwork, our timeless Silk Tie will add interest to any ensemble. Our 100% linen tie pairs well with lightweight button downs and blazers. Fully printed with original art and lined with complementary cool grey, available in modern or classic widths.
  • MaruvaWare Original handmade jewelry by Dianne Quarles This is a one-of-a-kind piece in the Muses of the African Diaspora Collection. Hand sculpted Muse polymer clay necklace and earring set embellished with freshwater pearls, black coral and seed beads. 20" necklace, 2.5" x 0.5" drop earrings The Adinkra symbol means bravery. Adinkra symbols are ancient African symbols from the Akan people of Ghana and Coté d’Ivoire. Each symbol represents an African proverb, an historic event, or life’s lessons handed down from the elders.
  • Yoga leggings have a stylish waist band with the MaruvaWare logo on the back. Leggings for workouts, casual strolls or simple relaxation sessions at home have never been this comfortable. You’ll want to wear these stretchy, soft and shiny leggings everywhere. This is a custom item. Please allow 2-3 weeks for production and shipping.
    Size Chart:   (the fit is tight)
    SizeSMLXL
    Waist28303537
    Hips38414549
    Inseam Length27 ⅞28 ¼28 ⅞29 ¼
  • This tank top is a winner. Beautiful  designs rendered in eye-popping colors.  Match with coordinated leggings or yoga leggings for the complete look.  Made in 100% polyester, made in the USA, and is soft light material. Expect 8-10 days for custom printing and delivery.
  • This tank top is a winner. Beautiful  designs rendered in eye-popping colors.  Match with coordinated leggings or yoga leggings for the complete look.  Made in 100% polyester, made in the USA, and is soft light material. Expect 8-10 days for custom printing and delivery.
  • Each wall painting print by Marcella Muhammad is available on paper and framed, on canvas, on metal, and on wood.  Bring your print to life with hundreds of different frame and mat combinations.  Framed prints are assembled, packaged, and shipped by an expert framing staff and delivered "ready to hang" with pre-attached hanging wire, mounting hooks, and nails.
  • These leggings are made of 82% polyester and 18% spandex with an elastic waistband. Smooth and comfortable microfiber yarn and each pair is printed, cut and sewn to your order.
  • These leggings are made of 82% polyester and 18% spandex with an elastic waistband. Smooth and comfortable microfiber yarn and each pair is printed, cut and sewn to your order.
  • These leggings are made of 82% polyester and 18% spandex with an elastic waistband. Smooth and comfortable microfiber yarn and each pair is printed, cut and sewn to your order.
  • $40.00

    This modal scarf made with soft, luxurious fabric will add a bold, modern statement to any wardrobe.
    Each item is custom-made and custom printed by VIDA with original art by Marcella Muhammad.
    Placement of artwork may vary upon receipt.
  • $65.00

     MARUVAWARE MODERN TEE - With a chic geometric cut, this top is the modern upgrade to your classic tee.

    Each item is custom-made and custom printed by VIDA with original art by Marcella Muhammad.
  • $40.00

    This scarf made with soft, luxurious fabric will add a bold, modern statement to any wardrobe.
    Each item is custom-made and custom printed by VIDA with original art by Marcella Muhammad.
    Placement of artwork may vary upon receipt.
  • The musical instruments are brought together by the wood and Kente textiles that represent the direct ties to an African Heritage.  I have purposefully blended the contemporary instruments with ancient instruments, resulting in a visual celebration of ancient to modern culture. The use of cowry  shells and amber beads represent the wealth of this culture.  
  • $65.00

     MARUVAWARE MODERN TEE - With a chic geometric cut, this top is the modern upgrade to your classic tee.

    Each item is custom-made and custom printed by VIDA with original art by Marcella Muhammad.
  • $65.00

     MARUVAWARE MODERN TEE - With a chic geometric cut, this top is the modern upgrade to your classic tee.

    Each item is custom-made and custom printed by VIDA with original art by Marcella Muhammad.
  • The legend of the origination of the Akua'ba doll comes from the story of a woman named "Akua" (many variations of the name are found as there are many variations of the spelling of "akua'ba") who could not get pregnant and went to a local diviner or priest and commissioned the carving of a small wooden doll. She carried and cared for the doll as if it were her own child, feeding it, bathing it and so on. Soon the people in the village started calling it "Akua" "ba" - meaning "Akua's child", since "ba" meant child. She soon became pregnant and her daughter grew up with the doll. This is one of my small works series.
  • This painting is the first of a series of musical pieces inspired by a juried show at the Hammonds House Museum Gallery in Atlanta, Georgia. The theme of the show is to be "From Songhai to Symphony Hall". As I researched to find out a bit about music in the Songhai people of Africa, I discovered that it was once the greatest empire in all of Africa and greatly influenced by Islam. The music is centered from one particular instrument called a Njarka. It is a large gourd with a small hole carved into it and attached by a long neck with one string. This instrument is used to center the basic beat of all other instruments that were used in the development of music in the Songhai region. This basic one string and one beat brought to mind something the great Dizzy Gillespie once said, that "without a back beat, you ain't got no jazz" And here is proof that there has always been a back beat in our early history of music all the way to today.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 24" x 36" This is one of two paintings reflecting the basic 4 elements using the models and the colors in their garments to carry this message. We are basically made up of these 4 elements which ties us to this planet and the universe. In the background are shapes with African influenced designs.
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 24" x 30" The painting titled “Ashé” brings together the ancient and modern elements of artistic expression into creative tribute to our ancestors. Musical instruments, hand carved masks, fabric and vibrant colors swirl together to depict the rich heritage of artistic expression that has survived for centuries to be handed down to each new generation. The word “Ashé” is an African expression that means “Amen” with all the reverence and soul that one would say in church. It is said after pouring libations to each named and un-named ancestor in their memory.
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size:  30" x 40" The inspiration for this painting came about from studying the ancestral bloodlines of my family and realizing the stark contrast of the generations. This painting depicts that lineage between the females of my African American family line in America from my (L) Great grandmother (Momma Ginny) escaping slavery and running her own business as a seamstress and raising her family; to my (R) Grandmother (Big Ruth) being a nurse and raising her family; and my mother (Little Ruth) (Center) a graduate of the Chicago Art Institute and raising her family. Even though this depicts my family, this can also fit the story of many African American families in this country.  
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 24" x 36" This painting is more figurative than my regular Plastic Space Abstract pieces. I began as usual with a realistic drawing and began abstracting the couple but they kept returning to a more realistic pose. It was the light that shines on their profiles that dictated the overall balance of this piece. Sometimes my paintings take over and so I tend to go with it and see where it takes me. This one surprised me in the outcome and has its own balance between abstract and realism. I was still able to capture the Plastic Space elements in the background and blend the couple so they flow with the sweeping motion of this kiss. I worked in layers beginning with the couple and then into the background careful to balance the direction of the eye as the viewer explores the couple to the background and back again to the couple.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 24" x 30" For many years I have done extensive research as to the actual meaning of the African masks of different regions. My quest was to find and reproduce the positive masks that aid in the development of a society. These masks from different regions of Africa represent masks that aid in the rites of passage from boys into manhood. It is then that boys are schooled on proper behavior, expectations, and moral codes of their society. The left mask (Basongye, Zaire) is one of healing, the center mask(Baule, Ivory Coast) is one of judgement as is the one on the left.(Ethiopia) They assure justice and fair morality within a society. These are worn only by men and are respected by all in the society.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size:  24" x 48" Ashé III is a tribute to the cultural traditions in our society that binds us together as a family. I have used masks from around the world representing a major event in our society that brings us together into a greater family unit.Masks from Alaska, Native American, African and Papua New Gunnea. When there is illness, the healing mask brings calm and reassurance, similar to having a family surround and comfort a sick person. The rite of passage mask aids a child’s transition to adulthood and adult responsibilities and expectations they must assume. The funerary mask keeps the memories of loved ones no longer with us in this world alive in our hearts. The fertility mask ensures the ability to have children and have good health in childbearing. The warrior mask depicts the strength and power of our Black men as protectors and leaders of our society. The judgment mask represents the responsibility to settle disputes with fairness and wisdom for the good of the whole society. The animal mask shows respect and good treatment for all life that is given to us by God’s grace. The textiles and carvings show appreciation of the arts and crafting of beautiful things by our people. These are the ties that bind our society into a great family of people.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 10" x 10" These 10" x 10" mask paintings are part of my "paint a small work a day for one month" attempt. This actually took 4 days. I am getting faster but the oils do take time to set when working in layers. The legend of the origination of the Akua'ba doll comes from the story of a woman named "Akua" (many variations of the name are found as there are many variations of the spelling of "akua'ba") who could not get pregnant and went to a local diviner or priest and commissioned the carving of a small wooden doll. She carried and cared for the doll as if it were her own child, feeding it, bathing it and so on. Soon the people in the village started calling it "Akua" "ba" - meaning "Akua's child", since "ba" meant child. She soon became pregnant and her daughter grew up with the doll.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 10" x 10" The ancient Baga people had rich traditions of multi-functional masks and sculpture. This mask was created to embody the strength, wisdom and leadership of the elephant. These masks were huge and worn on the shoulders during the dance ceremony.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size:  10" x 10" The lines of this mask were a challenge to translate into Plastic Space and were fun to explore. This art producing group from the Congo is known for their elaborate traditional carvings typically using many lines and elaborate hair renditions. Once more, I elaborate that these masks are not “EVIL” as most of the colonial Caucasian archaeologist claim and have managed to convince the world that they are. I was personally told by an African friend and artist that this is what the Africans told the colonial explorers who were stealing their masks and taking them away. It was an attempt to stop them from taking their masks and carvings which were traditional culture building tools. Many were buried to hide them and those using natural wood and fibers were lost to the elements. Many of the bronze carvings and masks are still buried around villages today.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 10" x 10" This painting is inspired by the ancient Bakwele dance mask of people that lived in Northern Gabon. The mask was used to bring people of different tribes together in harmony. It is distinct in the two long horns representing the sprite like spirit of the antelope.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 10" x 10" The Nigerian mask of celebration is a mask that lends itself to many interpretations that I enjoy exploring. I have done a series using this same mask in different approaches using my signature style of Plastic Space. The identifying parts of this type of mask are the bulging eye-lids with the cross hatch pattern and the laughing extended tongue. I enjoy using this mask to lighten the artwork and capture the lighthearted feeling it departs.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 24" x 30" This painting captures the ancient design of a Chi-Wara mask of the Bambara people of Mali. The carvings are so decorative and beautiful and in this painting I have created a swirling effect imitating the motion of the dancers when wearing this mask. This was a challenge because of the muted colors. I used a complete background of black to begin this painting and the colors reflect this giving a different presentation than my regular bright pallet.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas wrap Size:  24" x 30" This painting is a continuation of the musical series inspired by the title of "Songhai to Symphony Hall". It is one of two paintings that anchor the center piece called, "Soulful Strings and Percussion". They both reflect the fertility that comes from the spirit of the ancestors that cultivated the intelligence of creativity and its expression in the arts. A sound base was established by the ancestors of African Americans from which modern art forms derive their creative roots that continue to branch into the future. This spirit will continue to evolve and explore new and innovative vistas wether it is acknowledged by those "In power to declare great works of art" or not. Together in a tryptich, Fertility of Spirit I / Soulful Strings and Percussion / Fertility of Spirit II form a bold statement of the evolution of music from ancient Africa to the Halls of modern music. Rendered in "Plastic Space", I have incorporated the doll of fertility and the carving of a spirit guide along with the textiles of kings...Kente Cloth... And modern musical notes from an old "Negro Spiritual" ..."God's Goin' to Set This World on Fire"
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas wrap Size: 24" x 30" This painting is a continuation of the musical series inspired by the title of "Songhai to Symphony Hall". It is one of two paintings that anchor the center piece called, "Soulful Strings and Percussion". They both reflect the fertility that comes from the spirit of the ancestors that cultivated the intelligence of creativity and its expression in the arts. A sound base was established by the ancestors of African Americans from which modern art forms derive their creative roots that continue to branch into the future. This spirit will continue to evolve and explore new and innovative vistas wether it is acknowledged by those "In power to declare great works of art" or not. Together in a tryptich, Fertility of Spirit I / Soulful Strings and Percussion / Fertility of Spirit II form a bold statement of the evolution of music from ancient Africa to the Halls of modern music. Rendered in "Plastic Space", I have incorporated the doll of fertility and the carving of a spirit guide along with the textiles of kings...Kente Cloth... And modern musical notes from an old "Negro Spiritual" ..."God's Goin' to Set This World on Fire"
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 30" x 40" I have incorporated both stringed instruments and percussion. Images of the violin, guitar, banjo, and piano represent the strings. The talking drum, snare drum, tambourine, Shakara, djembe drum represent the percussion instruments in this painting. They are brought together by the wood and Kente textiles that represent the direct ties to my African Heritage.  I have purposefully blended the contemporary instruments with the original instruments, resulting in a visual bridge from ancient to modern culture. The background have lines of vibration that give a sense of active rhythm that ties the instruments together into a profound and original harmony.
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 18" x 24" This painting was inspired to provide art for cards. I had an opportunity to send ideas for card art to Carol Joy Creations as a source of income if the image was licensed. This painting represents those wonderful grandmothers out there who are blessed to have grandchildren to love and spoil. I didn't have a lot of time with my grandmother as a little girl but I do remember her fondly and the great experiences with her.
  • Medium: Litho Gloss & Matt print Image size 17.5" x 25" Paper size 22" x 30"
  • Medium: Oil on canvas board Size: 18" x 24" This portrait was one of three that inspired a series of positive faces of Black women from around the world. I juxtaposed each portrait with African carved figures that complement the portrait and symbolize their Africa ancestral origin. I added the Baobab tree, believed in some folklore to be the tree of life, as a symbol of African traditions. Chenweh is an Ibo name meaning God’s own blessing. I make it a point to paint positive Black women as a statement of the need to influence young women to make the right choices for themselves and to see themselves as the Queens they were meant to be. As long as Black women are denigrated in the media and music, we are doomed as a people. As the Honorable Minister Farrakhan once said, “A nation can rise no higher than its woman”.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas wrap Size:  24" x 36" Kwanzaa is an African American and Pan-African holiday which celebrates family, community and culture. Kwanzaa is a CULTURAL holiday, not a religious one. Kwanzaa was created in 1996 by Dr. Maulana Karenga, professor and chair of the Department of Black Studies at California State University, Long Beach. It is celebrated from December 26 through January 1. The origins of Kwanzaa are in the first harvest celebrations of Africa from which it takes its name. The name Kwanzaa is derived from the phrase "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first fruits" in Swahili. Kwanzaa celebrates and reinforces family and community values. It stresses self reliance and creativity. The elements of Kwanzaa celebration includes the following seven principals:
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 30" x 40" Playa Buffet is part of my "I want to go back to Playa Del Carmen Series" that has been a recurring theme in my recent still life's. It is the warm tropical feel that these Plastic Space figurative abstracts project. One can almost feel the Spanish tile floor under your bare feet as you pick a morning fruit dish before heading out to the beach.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 16" x 20" Using Plastic Space, I created this still life set up and recorded the process from set up to finished painting. This was illustrated in my book on Plastic Space. The gourd was grown in my garden and the African thumb piano is a part of my collection. I juxtaposed these items with the basket and fruit for a color shift. The vase in the background is one I made in college under the tutelage of Ceramist Shige Yamada of Hawaii. I almost decided to become a potter instead of a painter, but soon realized the overhead of materials was too great for me to look at pottery full time and returned to painting.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 18" x 24" This unusual vase was inspired by an artist that created porcelain vases with the patterns of dreads flaring out from the vase. I used this influence to create my own Plastic Space version of a vase in this still life set up. The color palette is a bit cooler than I usually use and creates an interesting feel.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 11" x 14" This was inspired by my tropical still life series using the still life set up and hidden portions of masks blending into the background.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 30" x 40" This painting represents all teachers of the time dedicated to improving the literacy of Black Americans during the voter rights movement. Septima Clark is teaching this man to write his own name as opposed to the X he used before. In the background are books that represent the vast knowledge available to the literate. On the bulletin board are a couple of flyers of the times.
  • Medium: oil on archival canvas wrap Size: 24" x 48" On the left of the canvas, I have juxtaposed the two strong Black Women to be in front of the “Rebel Flag” which represented injustice for black people. On the flag are cotton bolls and shackles, symbols of the oppression and forced labor of our people. On the right and seeming to come out of the flag as if in a dream I have drawn a chain of slaves being driven to market. As you gaze at this canvas you see the story from Africa to the American South and from there the struggle for freedom and justice led by Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth.