• Medium:  Original oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 30" x 40" I was inspired by the images of the children's crusade and wanted to express the energy and struggle the children endured to keep standing by clinging together as a determined group despite the high power blasts of the fire hoses. Rendered in oil on canvas, I used more of an impressionistic approach to keep the identities of the children vague so more focus is on the emotion of the event. This event actually took place in front of a row of buildings on a city street. At first, I had the buildings behind the group but it seemed to diminish the power of the emotion I wanted to create. So I took them out and placed the group in a wooded isolated scene. I wanted to create a feeling of isolation, that there was no help for them and the event was dire and they had to rely on each other to remain upright. The trees created more of an atmosphere of a place where lynching happens or the isolation of jail cell bars.This painting represents the unity needed to succeed and without unity we are bound to fail.
  • Medium: Litho print Image Size: 5" high x 7" long (all three images included) Paper Size: 8" x 20"
  • Medium: Litho print Image size: 17.5" x 23.5" Paper size: 19" x 26"
  • Medium: Litho print Paper Size: 18" x 24"
  • Ashe

    $165.00
    Medium: Giclee print on Arches archival paper Image Size: 23.5" x 19" Paper Size: 28" x 23" This print was published by Maruva DQ, Inc. and actually printed by the artist using a wide format Giclee printer to produce these high quality prints.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 30" x 40" The spirits of African American ancestors surround Dr.Maulana Karenga who started more than 30 years ago the Kwanzaa celebration that is practiced by people around the world. Kwanzaa is an African American and Pan-African holiday which celebrates family, community and culture. Kwanzaa is a CULTURAL holiday, not a religious one.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas wrap Size: 24" x 30" Many sharecroppers had the whole family involved with harvesting the crops. Even the matriarch with her cane is watching the youngest of the family in the fields. For this painting I intentionally left the features vague in the figures to capture more of the atmosphere and harsh conditions of the moment.
  • Medium: Oil/ Silver foil on archival canvas Size: 24" x 36" The figures represent the beginning of man, woman, and child on the earth. The man is the protector of the family emerging from the earth. He brings with him a strength and power given to the Black man for endurance. The woman is the spiritual being and the “glue” of the family. She keeps her family grounded with morality and traditions. She is his help mate and looks to the star studded heavens for spiritual guidance for them all. Together they bring strong moral generations into the world. I was inspired to paint this image after watching the series of “Roots” on television and being influenced by the part when the newborn baby was held up to the night sky and told, "Behold, the only thing greater than you". This painting is featured with three other of my works in the video presentation titled "The Journey" narrated by the late Ossie Davis. It was presented by the APEX Museum in Atlanta, Georgia and plays in their theater and is also available on CD.  
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas wrap Size: 24" x 36" My husband, Alee Muhammad, inspired me to paint this portrait as a tribute to the potential historical value of the times. The first African American President of the United Stated of America. 44th  President Barack Hussain Obama is reflected with the White House (built by slaves) in the background, the American flag by his side, and over his head the first three words of the Constitution of the United States of America, "We the people." It reminds us that the power of the people is still and must remain the foundation of this nation.  
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 24" x 24" This mask was inspired by my watching the History channel while painting my Maruvian Mask series. I had a blank canvas and on came the story of Solomon and Sheba but the actors were basically White. I immediately began this painting as part of the portrait style of masks to answer this gross misrepresentation of Black History to the media audience. It is about time that the faces we see from Africa look like faces from Africa and not Caucasians from Europe! How about  Idris Elba as Solomon and Lupita Amondi Nyong'o as Sheba? Now that would be a movie to see for sure!  
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size:  10" x 10" This mask reflects the Sankofa from Ghana which literally means "go back and fetch it" meaning to reflect on your past to enhance the future. These symbols  are printed on fabric, carved into gold weights, and jewelry. These many designs contain a large inventory of folk sayings that share wisdom.
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 10" x 10" This is another quick three day painting of small works for a month. This painting had musical inspirations mixed with the feel of Africa in a kaleidoscope of abstracted forms.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 10" x 30" This image reminds me of a Nautilus swimming in the ocean. This mask was inspired by the Balinese people living near the water. This painting is part of a small work series influenced by masks from around the world. I was originally trying to do a painting a day but ran into a snag when the oils took to long to dry or set. It left me being able to do a painting each 3-6 days depending on how quick the oils set up. This mask is one of three diptych canvases (which means two canvases to make one image) that I finished from my small works series.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size:  10" x 10" This painting features the Kalimba, musical thumb piano, juxtaposed with parts of various mask features and beads. It is part of the series where I painted these small works for a month back to back. Most were of masks but two were more of the musical feel.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 10" x 10" The identifiable lines on this healing mask are abstracted and carried into and around the image creating motion and a sense of infinity as the eye is captured and begins to travel around and around. This feeling captures the notion that the healing expertise began at the beginning and will continue into the future of this planet. In this mask is such knowledge and experience that carries into many generations and is only now beginning to be recognized by modern man.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 10" x 10" The inspiration for this mask was from the designs of a carving on the side of an ancient calabash bowl found in Ethiopia.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 10" x 30" Having celebrated Chinese New Year in San Francisco China Town while living in the California Bay area, I was influenced by the intricate designs of the Chinese Dragon masks and floats. This mask is a reflection of that influence. This mask is one of three diptych canvases (which means two canvases to make one image) that I finished from my small works series.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 10" x 10" An abstraction of an ancient Kuyu mask from Central Africa done in my quick 3-6 day series. I originally wanted to paint one a day but discovered that in oils, I could only do them as fast as 3-6 days for the oils to set before I was able to paint another area of the work. Acrylics would allow me to actually paint one a day but I prefer oils as my medium.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size: 10" x 30" This was inspired by an ancient mask from the Kran people of Liberia. During this timeframe, the African slave trade was becoming more prominent and many of these masks were stolen and taken to Europe for their private collections. Ironically, this mask was used for healing practices. This mask is one of three diptych canvases (which means two canvases to make one image) that I finished from my small works series.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size:  10" x 10" The Nigerian mask of celebration and joy is a mask that lends itself to many interpretations that I enjoy exploring. I have done a series using this same mask in different approaches using my signature style of Plastic Space. The identifying parts of this type of mask are the bulging eye-lids with the cross hatch pattern and the laughing extended tongue. I enjoy using this mask to lighten the artwork and capture the lighthearted feeling it departs.
  • Medium: Oil on archival gallery wrap canvas Size:  24" x 24" This was an experiment to see if my Plastic Space would translate the human face. I had fun working this painting of no one in particular. It is a play of the human facial structure mixed with the influence of African design and symbols. There are some African Mask techniques applied as well. I did play with the variety of skin tones found in our culture. It is a fact finally admitted by scientists that all humanity came from Africa.  So with this in mind, I applied the many skin tones within the spectrum of these faces.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 14" x 18" Devil mask?  No way! This ancient mask is from the Bobo Fang in Mali. It reflected the antelope and was traditionally used as a kind of prayer to appease the animal spirit and thank them for the life that will feed the village.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size:  11" x 14" This painting was inspired by the ancient  BASONGE healing mask used by designated healers that brought with them years of experience in herbs and medicines (much like modern doctors of today) and this mask was worn to ensure a positive image to aid in faith and assurance of the skills of the wearer. To see this mask brought about a feeling to the patient that healing was on the way. Don't we often feel a sense of relief when the doctor with the stethoscope around his neck is on the job? Faith is a thing that can still heal today. The identifiable lines on this healing mask are abstracted and carried into and around the image creating motion and a sense of infinity as the eye is captured and begins to travel around and around. This feeling captures the notion that the healing expertise began at the beginning and will continue into the future of this planet. In this mask is such knowledge and experience that carries into many generations and is only now beginning to be recognized by modern man.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 9" x 12" This is the first of a series of Spice paintings. It was inspired by my sister, Dianne, who is always alert to ideas for applications. These were done to fulfill an idea for tiles in home decor. The use of Plastic Space allows the images to fit into any decor and bring about an earthy natural feel that is calming and yet maintains a bit of intrigue to the viewer. Red pears and a lime with a spice jar holding nutmeg spice is the still life subject matter. Each painting in this series has a still life of fruits or vegetables, the jar with a name of an exotic spice and the added signature piece of a mask hidden in the background.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 11" x 14" This was inspired by my tropical still life series using the still life set up and hidden portions of masks blending into the background.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size:  11" x 14" I enjoyed using my signature style of Plastic Space abstract to paint the tropical feel of these still life set ups that can enhance any area of the home.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size:  11" x 14" There is a real variety of tulip called Fiesta Tulip and they are very colorful. By placing them in this still life set up, I added another dimension of color keeping the tropical feel. The crystal vase was a wedding gift that I enjoy using because of the reflective light patterns within the crystal. It is always a pleasing challenge to complete a still life in Plastic Space.I enjoy using my signature style of Plastic Space abstract to paint the tropical feel of these still life set ups that can enhance any area of the home.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 9" x 12" The use of Plastic Space allows the images to fit into any decor and bring about an earthy natural feel that is calming and yet maintains a bit of intrigue to the viewer.  Each painting in this series has a still life of fruits or vegetables, the jar with a name of an exotic spice and  the signature piece of a mask hidden in the background.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size:  9" x 12" The use of Plastic Space allows the images to fit into any decor and bring about an earthy natural feel that is calming and yet maintains a bit of intrigue to the viewer.  Each painting in this series has a still life of fruits or vegetables, the jar with a name of an exotic spice and  the signature piece of a mask hidden in the background.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size:  9" x 12" The use of Plastic Space allows the images to fit into any decor and bring about an earthy natural feel that is calming and yet maintains a bit of intrigue to the viewer.  Each painting in this series has a still life of fruits or vegetables, the jar with a name of an exotic spice and  the signature piece of a mask hidden in the background.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 18" x 36" Tropical Buffet is part of my "I want to go back to Playa Del Carmen Series" that has been a recurring theme in my recent still life's. It is the warm tropical feel that these Plastic Space figurative abstracts project. One can almost feel the Spanish tile floor under your bare feet as you pick a morning fruit dish before heading out to the beach. Of course I like to place portions of masks into the background to add that richness of a cultural flair.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 18" x 36" Tropical Buffet is part of my "I want to go back to Playa Del Carmen Series" that has been a recurring theme in my recent still life's. It is the warm tropical feel that these Plastic Space figurative abstracts project. One can almost feel the Spanish tile floor under your bare feet as you pick a morning fruit dish before heading out to the beach. Of course I like to place portions of masks into the background to add that richness of a cultural flair.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 14" x 18" This still life set up is rendered using my signature style of Plastic Space abstract. Note the use of portions of masks in the background to create an atmosphere of a rich cultural heritage.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 11" x 14" I enjoy gardening and growing fresh vegetables and flowers. One summer my Zinnias were especially beautiful and prolific. I couldn't help but put them into a still life to capture for posterity.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 11" x 14" I enjoy gardening and growing fresh vegetables and flowers. One summer my Zinnias were especially beautiful and prolific. I couldn't help but put them into a still life to capture for posterity. I painted two different still life's using these flowers to create a pair for decorative purposes.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 11" x 14" My goal was to juxtapose fruits and vegetables that were of a more tropical feel with cultural objects. Note the portions of masks in the background used to enhance that tropical feel. This is one of my favorite still life settings.  
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 9" x 12" In the foreground of this painting one can see a ceramic vase that I made in ceramics class in college. I positioned some fresh peaches on the drapery around the vase. In the background is a palm plant and an African mask. This painting is part of a series of still life done in the style of Plastic Space.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 11" x 14" This still life is part of a series using several collected pieces of mine to enhance some Key limes before they were used to make a pie. The carved gourd came from Africa and the vases were made by me in ceramics. I incorporated the mask for interest and a tie to my heritage. This is another of my favorite still life settings. The pie turned out great and yummy!
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 11" x 14" I celebrated my first full grown watermelon from my garden in this still life set up. It gave an end of summer, beginning of fall feel to this scene. The melon was small but sweet! If I can keep the squirrels away, I might try to grow  watermelons again. The pomegranate was a touch of my childhood.  I used to love eating the them, but not so much now as an adult.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 30" x 40" Playa Buffet is part of my "I want to go back to Playa Del Carmen Series" that has been a recurring theme in my recent still life's. It is the warm tropical feel that these Plastic Space figurative abstracts project. One can almost feel the Spanish tile floor under your bare feet as you pick a morning fruit dish before heading out to the beach.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas wrap Size: 30" x 40" Playa Buffet is part of my "I want to go back to Playa Del Carmen Series" that has been a recurring theme in my recent still life's. It is the warm tropical feel that these Plastic Space figurative abstracts project. One can almost feel the Spanish tile floor under your bare feet as you select a morning fruit dish before heading out to the beach.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas Size: 24' x 48" The first time I ever tasted palm wine was in an African restaurant in California. I was amazed how sparkling and mild it tasted and likened it to Asti Spumante champagne, but much better. To think that they have been enjoying this taste in Africa for long before Asti ever hit the market! This painting is in remembrance of that first taste.
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size:  48" x 60" This is a portrait of a young Nina Simone in a reflective pose, hand under her chin and sporting a head wrap turban of Kente cloth representing her ancestral ties to Africa. There are 6 songs sung by Nina referenced visually in this portrait. Musical notes surround her filling her with a “Young Gifted and Black” talent full of versatility. One eye is a bull’s eye with the silhouette of a black woman representing the ever present drama of “The Other Woman” in the affairs of love. “Here Comes The Sun” beginning to shine through the stained glass windows representing the strong faith and hope for a better future. Around her shoulders are the remnants of a dead “Old Jim Crow” revealing a portion of our nations flag draped over her left shoulder. “I Put A Spell On You” is cast onto a divining basket with the bones and shells.
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 18" x 24" This is the first of a series inspired by a senior gentleman strolling on the street all dressed in red. Red suit, hat, shoes, and sporting a cane doing his slow walk on the West End of Atlanta (in the HOOD) during a street festival. He was so cool with his eyes checking everything out. I just had to capture this moment and I feel it does him justice.  This study is more outside the box of my usual figurative abstracts in that it has developed a stand alone character.
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 18" x 24" I used my signature style of Plastic Space to explore  the Art Nuveau Big Band era character in tuxedo. He is so suave and debonair as he meets and greets his guests at his event. This study is more outside the box of my usual figurative abstracts in that it has developed a stand alone character.
  • Medium: Oil on archival canvas wrap Size:  24" x 36" Kwanzaa is an African American and Pan-African holiday which celebrates family, community and culture. Kwanzaa is a CULTURAL holiday, not a religious one. Kwanzaa was created in 1996 by Dr. Maulana Karenga, professor and chair of the Department of Black Studies at California State University, Long Beach. It is celebrated from December 26 through January 1. The origins of Kwanzaa are in the first harvest celebrations of Africa from which it takes its name. The name Kwanzaa is derived from the phrase "matunda ya kwanza" which means "first fruits" in Swahili. Kwanzaa celebrates and reinforces family and community values. It stresses self reliance and creativity. The elements of Kwanzaa celebration includes the following seven principals:
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 24" x 36" This painting is a personal statement addressing the enigmatic need by too many Black American females seeking acceptance by altering their appearance to resemble a more accepted version of beauty, sometimes to the extreme. This painting was inspired by observing a beautiful ebony skinned girl working as a cashier in my neighborhood. She had virtually, in my personal opinion, ruined her queenly looks by having her hair bleached out to a strange shade of orange-yellow. It was braided and hanging down around her shoulders. She was wearing very obvious blue contact lenses that did not enhance her looks but made her appear to be from another planet. I can only guess, as happens too often, that at some time in her life she was convinced that she was ugly because she was black. This look might make her feel better. In my opinion, this young lady had actually destroyed her natural beauty for her imagined image of beauty. Parents, be sure to teach your children high self esteem and pride in who they are and the natural beauty they posses and don't forget to look in the mirror to make sure you are setting a good example to your children. Our history must be taught to our children to help develop self pride and worthiness and it is a family responsibility to see it done. As an educator, I know for a fact that unfortunately schools cannot be relied on to do this for us.
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 16" x 20" This is one of my early Plastic Space figurative pieces. This predates the use of masks in the background. I wanted to create a Madonna and child design to use for licensing.
  • Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 24" x 36" This painting was done just for fun and I loved that dress the lady is wearing. So I juxtaposed her into a monochromatic setting of flora and the zebra reflects her dress patterning. She stands out because of her coloring and at the same time fits into the overall design.
  • Medium: Oil on canvas board Size: 18" x 24" This portrait was one of three that inspired a series of positive faces of Black women from around the world. I juxtaposed each portrait with African carved figures that complement the portrait and symbolize their Africa ancestral origin. I added the Baobab tree, believed in some folklore to be the tree of life, as a symbol of African traditions. Chenweh is an Ibo name meaning God’s own blessing. I make it a point to paint positive Black women as a statement of the need to influence young women to make the right choices for themselves and to see themselves as the Queens they were meant to be. As long as Black women are denigrated in the media and music, we are doomed as a people. As the Honorable Minister Farrakhan once said, “A nation can rise no higher than its woman”.